Snack Music

Snack Music

A few years ago I was diagnosed as having Type II Diabetes. It was quite a shock as I hadn’t felt unwell and had not realised just how bad my diet was.  In the first year I used a low carb/high fat diet to get my weight normal and to be able to stop taking medication. Since then I have paid better attention to my diet and started to exercise regularly, I have stayed off medication, my blood pressure and lipid levels  are better than when I was a younger man and I am fitter. I also feel fitter and stronger.

When I look back to see what I had done wrong to end up in this state, it was clear that snack food had been my downfall. Looking back it was obvious quick, easy to eat, high carbohydrate treats had taken over my diet.  Snacks had done it; a sandwich, a cake, a pie, a biscuit, a sausage roll .. there were many ways I could snack instead of eating regularly. I had developed a bad habit of eating easy food with a quick reward. There was no need for preparation, little need for thought, just eat and go.

Over the years this had done considerable damage to my body. I was three stones overweight, no amount of leaving my shirt outside my trousers could hide my belly, I could not run, and eventually my body started to fail. Fortunately I started to have to get up at night to pee and thinking I might have the other old man’s friend (prostate problems) I saw the doctor who, alarmed at the high levels of my blood sugar, started medication immediately.

I use the word “fortunately” as I am glad I found out the damage I was doing to myself before discovering it, too late,  after a heart attack, an amputated foot or after going blind. I have turned some things around and hopefully reduced my risks somewhat. But I was clear that snacks had been my downfall, they had messed up my diet and consequently messed up me.

However, recently I have been trying to learn from my mistakes. If I did this much damage unwittingly, what other damage might I be doing ? Are there other dangerous snacks I have been overeating ?

I realised that in cultural terms I was wreaking similar damage in other areas by snacking. I decided to tackle these problems also before they started to cause problems or disability. I have started first with music. I was aware that over the years I have started to prefer small, easily digestible pieces of music; pieces of music that require little thought or attention and which catch you quickly and satisfy instantly. I prefered the snacks of the musicalworld.

I had been led to this by the mp3 and the download. Rather than listen to a concert or an LP I would listen to a single track. Instead of listening to the whole opera I’d listen to the popular aria made famous recently by its use in an advertisment. I noted that my musical tastes have been coarsened and  are now much more reliant of rhythm and beat – the quick hit, the ‘carbs’ of the music world. I noticed also that often I was guided to music by the accompanying video which makes the emotional impact much more effective while, at the same time, taking away the need to think and consider. I think it is no surpise that the videos are becoming more important as it is not really the music that is being sold now. It is the quick snack, the fast food of the music world, rather than a balanced healthy diet.

I’m starting to see results. This morning was improved by listening to “A night on bald Mountain” and last night was spent in the company of the Dance Macabre  of Camille Saint-Saens. This has been much better for my health and soul than my previous diet and hopefully, over time, I’ll see similar amounts of improvement. Certainly I feel better and I am also much more aware of what I consume musically and that, in itself, is not a bad thing.


Night on Bald Mountain

Dance Macabre


via Daily Prompt: Snack

The Silence of our Friends (Ed West)

This is a short but important book. Part of the Kindle Single series, it is 51gAccSIyJLonly 58 pages long, and I must admit I took it on a whim after seeing it in my “Prime Reading” suggestion list. However, despite its small size it contains a great deal of important material and tells a dispiriting and worrisome story.

This book is about the ongoing war against the Christians who live in the middle East. There is a campaign of religious cleansing in progress and already the number of Christians in the area has dropped dramatically. Much of the violence and death is a consequence of a war waged in the name of Islam and, unfortunately, for fear of appearing Islamophobic , this is not being reported. Major atrocities create barely a ripple in the world’s news.

I was ashamed, as I read this book, that I was ignorant of the horrors that were being met by Christians in the area. I had some awareness of the terror campaign against the Copts in Egypt but not the extent of the problem nor the problems besetting other religious minorities. The mainstream media in Europe has a preoccupation with the Arab-Jewish in the area to the extent that it sees no other problems. This focus is often partisan and does not wish to admit problems that islamofascist groups in the region pose.

If we wish to be libertarians and support freedom of thought and association, if we are liberals and support freedom of religious expression, or if we are anti-fascists and wish to fight developing fascism, then this is our fight. We need to promote awareness of this problem and assist our friends and brothers under threat.

 

 

 

 

The fury and rage.

The fury and rage.

Before all the dead have been found, before anyone has been buried, and the left has started using them as fodder to make political points. Before we know the facts they are trying to create the narrative – this, in their eyes, was a fire caused by austerity and social inequality. The possibilities of criminal negligence, inadequate building regulations or of materials failure are all put out of mind, while they try and stir the flames for their “Day of Rage”.

I will certainly feel enraged if we discover that malevolence or negligence caused this tragedy. If people were sacrificed for short term gain then the fury will be real and justified. But I will also be enraged if this manipulated political fury allows the guilty to hide from responsibility. I fear the shifting the focus from the real task of finding our the causes of the fire, and the causes of the failure of systems to mitigate against the fire’s deadly effects,  to the task of scoring political points will obscure the truth and allow the guilty to escape.

There are likely to be, at the very least, lessons to be learnt on how to offer help and support to communities in the wake of tragedies like this. Knowing how to do this, and doing it, is more important than scoring a point against a Tory council.

The only bright glimmer of hope so far has been in the response of the local community. Local groups and charities have managed to get assistance to the victims very rapidly and with great skill. They have shown that individuals, working voluntarily, can outperform government agencies. Rather than being ashamed of this, as some commentators have suggested, we should celebrate this and consider how we could support this approach more generally.